Question: What Is Distal Arthrogryposis?

What is the cause of arthrogryposis?

The major cause of arthrogryposis is fetal akinesia (ie, decreased fetal movements) due to fetal abnormalities (eg, neurogenic, muscle, or connective tissue abnormalities; mechanical limitations to movement) or maternal disorders (eg, infection, drugs, trauma, other maternal illnesses)..

What does arthrogryposis mean?

Arthrogryposis, also called arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC), involves a variety of non-progressive conditions that are characterized by multiple joint contractures (stiffness) and involves muscle weakness found throughout the body at birth.

Can arthrogryposis be cured?

Treatment for Arthrogryposis. While there is no cure for arthrogryposis, there are nonoperative and operative methods aimed to improve range of motion and function at the sites of contracture.

Is arthrogryposis genetic?

Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is not inherited in most cases; however, a genetic cause can be identified in about 30% of affected people. It can be a component of many different genetic conditions, including those caused by a single gene change or a chromosomal abnormality, such as trisomy 18.

Can arthrogryposis be prevented?

How can arthrogryposis multiplex congenita be prevented? At the current time, there is no known way to prevent arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. It occurs in approximately 1in 3000 births and is associated with interuterine crowding and low amniotic fluid volume, but there are no preventive measures.

Does arthrogryposis worsen?

Arthrogryposis does not get worse over time. For most children, treatment can lead to big improvements in how they can move and what they can do. Most children with arthrogryposis have typical thinking and language skills. Most have a normal life span.